Timisoara, 18-24 June

ECIS 2022 - New Horizons in Digitally United Societies

Tracks Description


May 19, 2021
Track N°1: THEME | Conference Theme Track

Track Chairs

Track Description

Digital technologies and associated platforms transcend traditional societal boundaries and reach across nations, cultures, and previously distinct industries and sectors of society. This is reshaping the world, and provides opportunities to foster prosperity, human well-being, and sustainability. Of course, it also introduces challenges, increases risks, and presents a variety of ethical issues. As leading thinkers about the impact of digital technologies on individuals, organizations, and society, IS researchers have a key role to play in the responsible and empowering transition to a digitally united world. This conference theme track is about thinking through the opportunities and challenges associated with digitally united societies, broadly conceived.

We welcome original works taking any methodological or epistemological approach. We will consider both empirical and theoretical papers. Accepted papers will provide (or offer the potential to provide) substantial theoretical and practical contributions to the IS literature.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital convergence and the dissolution of industry boundaries
  • The role of platform ecosystems in transcending traditional social boundaries
  • Digital technologies for social inclusion
  • How technology might ameliorate and/or exacerbate the global digital divide
  • The prospects and potential risks of pro-societal information systems (e.g., nudging health apps, open government data, etc.)
  • Digital technologies and the Sustainable Development Goals
  • Artificial intelligence and digital empowerment
  • Governance of algorithmic systems in business organizations, governments, and society
  • The ability of virtual networking to foster and strengthen social ties and social movements
  • Risk, security, privacy, and adverse effects of cross boundary digital platforms, virtual work, and industry transformation
  • Responsible digital transformations
  • Ethical issues for digital transformation and digital platforms

Associate Editors

  • Carolina Salge, University of Georgia, United States
  • Emmanouil (Manos) Gkeredakis, IESE Business School, University of Navarra , Spain
  • Eoin Whelan, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
  • Frederik von Briel, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Gondy Leroy, University of Arizona, United States
  • Hanna Krasnova, University of Potsdam, Germany
  • Harris Kyriakou, ESSEC Business School, France
  • Jin Gerlach, University of Passau, Germany
  • Julian Lehmann, The Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Kjersti Danilova, Norwegian School of Economics, Norway
  • Lauri Wessel, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
  • Leona Chandra-Kruse, University of Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein
  • Marina Fiedler, University of Passau, Germany
  • Mazen Shawosh, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Saudi Arabia
  • Thorsten Schoormann, University of Hildesheim, Germany
  • Zhewei Zhang, Warwick Business School, United Kingdom
Track N°2 GENIS | General Track

Track Chairs

  • Shengnan Han, Stockholm University, Sweden
  • Sven Laumer, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Isabel Ramos, University of Minho, Portugal

Track Description

The General Track is intended for high-quality research papers and researchinprogress papers on topics that do not have a specific fit with other tracks, including the conference theme track. It aims to attract unique and novel papers and give authors an additional degree of freedom, also from an epistemological, ontological, and methodological standpoint.

Please check the detailed descriptions of other tracks before submitting your paper to the General Track in order to ensure the best possible fit with your submission. After a careful assessment, the General Track co-chairs might move your paper to other tracks.

The General Track is also the track to which chairs of other tracks are welcome to submit, since they are not allowed to submit to their own track.

Associate Editors

  • Amarolinda Klein, Unisinos, Brazil
  • Anastasia Constantelou, University of Aegean, Greece
  • Angela Roth, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany
  • Bendik Bygstad, University Of Oslo, Norway
  • Christian Maier, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Cristiane Pedron, Nove de Julho University, Brazil
  • Gongtai Wang, The University of Queensland, Australia
  • Hongxiu Li, Tampere University, Finland
  • Jacqueline Corbett, Université Laval, Canada
  • Kalina Staykova, Wariwick Business School, United Kingdom
  • Katja Bley, Technisch Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Leonor Teixeira, Universitty of Aveiro, Portugal
  • Maheshwar Boodraj, Boise State University, United States
  • Mark de Reuver, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands
  • Mathias Kraus, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Shahrokh Nikou, Åbo Akademi University, Finland
  • Tim Huygh, Open Universiteit, Netherlands
Track N°3: AIISRP | Artificial Intelligence in IS Research and Practice

Track Chairs

Track Description

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a term with an evolving meaning and encompasses a vast amount of techniques, tools and technological artefacts. The investigation of AI is always timely, but even more so as its use diffuses throughout a number of areas, ranging from household applications, agriculture, healthcare, warfare, but also in production and the supply chain world. Therefore, the track seeks to explore further the potential of AI for the Information Systems field and shed more light in the management of practices and processes. At the same time, we consider crucial to reflect on the challenges, the implications and the unintended consequences stemming out of the use of AI and its applications for organisations and society at large.

We welcome conceptual and empirical papers with a focus on AI that make a clear contribution to the literature of Information Systems. We welcome any methodological stance (qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods etc) and we welcome in particular contrarian and critical views.

Below we list an indicative list of topics:

  • Challenges and Opportunities (methodological and practical) for AI adoption
  • Ethical implications, unintended consequences and the dark side of AI
  • AI in organizations: decision-making, supply-chains etc.
  • AI for decision making in organizational contexts
  • Swarm and Collective Intelligence for smart applications
  • Business Process Management and AI
  • AI-driven innovation
  • Decision-making and Forecasting
  • Humanitarian applications of AI
  • Sustainability, resilience and AI
  • AI in emergent situations and risk management
  • AI for addressing societal challenges
  • AI in healthcare
  • The future of work in an AI-driven world
  • AI for Information Systems Development
  • Industry 4.0
  • Intelligent Automation versus AI

Associate Editors

  • Alaa Marshan, Brunel University London, United Kingdom
  • Alessandro Checco, The University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
  • Alex Zarifis, Loughborough University, United Kingdom
  • Alexander Kempton, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Alvaro Arenas, IE University, Spain
  • Arianna Polyviou, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
  • Athina Ioannou, University of Surrey, United Kingdom
  • Caitlin Bentley, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
  • Elena Parmiggiani, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • Eleni Lioliou, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom
  • Fotis Kitsios, University of Macedonia, Greece
  • Georgios Zois, Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece
  • John Krogstie, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • Kayode Odusanya, Loughborough University, United Kingdom
  • Konstantina Valogianni, IE University, Spain
  • Lauren Waardenburg, IESEG School of Management, France
  • Masoud Fakhimi, University of Surrey, United Kingdom
  • Patrick Mikalef, NTNU, Norway
  • Pavlos Eirinakis, University o Piraeus, Greece
  • Polyxeni Vasilakopoulou, University of Agder, Norway
  • Samrat Gupta, Indian Institute of Management, India
  • Samuel Fosso Wamba, Toulouse Business School, France
  • Savvas Papagiannidis, Newcastle University, United Kingdom
  • Silvia Masiero, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Spyros Angelopoulos, Durham University, United Kingdom
  • Stefan Lessmann, Humboldt-University of Berlin , Germany
  • Stella Despoudi, Aston University, United Kingdom
  • Thanos Papadopoulos, University of Kent, United Kingdom
  • Umair ul Hassan, Maynooth University, Ireland
  • Uthayasankar Sivarajah, University of Bradford, United Kingdom
  • Vasilis Stavrou, Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece
  • Yichuan Wang, University of Sheffield , United Kingdom
Track N°4: AIDW | Artificial Intelligence and Digital Work

Track Chairs

Track Description

Workplaces and the way of working are undergoing a process of change, leading to a digital work environment characterized. In this context, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is taking a serious role for different contexts, such as automatization, data analysis, and predictions. To get insights from data, different AI techniques and tools can be applied. These insights can be utilized to further enhance and drive the digitalization of work. At this point we have not fully understood the impact of AI on digital work i.e., which chances and risks we can expect. The impact can be, however, observed on organizational level, technological level and behavioral level.

Questions, which arise are: How do we manage AI in organizations? What are the technological requirements for implementing AI in organizations? How does AI change the way of working? How can we avoid a resistance to change by employees? How do we design AI transparent and ethical? How can AI enable digital upskilling and learning in organizations? Overall, this track raises the question how digitalization changes the work environment and the way of working in the digital era. In this track, we welcome conceptual, empirical and design-oriented papers that analyse, explain or predict implications of AI on the future of work in organizations, or that design AI-based solutions in the context of digital work.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • AI-enabled transformation of work processes and routines
  • Interaction, collaboration, and communication in a digital work environment enabled by AI
  • Implications of AI on Gender and Diversity at a digital workplace
  • Resistance to Change driven by AI
  • Ethics and legal aspects in digital work
  • Responsible AI at the digital workplace
  • Digital upskilling of the workforce enabled by AI
  • AI-enabled change and learning processes in organizations
  • New ways of working driven by AI
  • AI enabled Digital Detox
  • Human-AI teams in digital work

Associate Editors

  • Benedikt Berger, University of Münster, Germany
  • Benjamin van Giffen, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • Björn Ross, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Christian Dremel, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • Christoph Peters, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • Dominik Siemon, LUT University, Finland
  • Jan Beinke, German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Germany
  • Joschka Huellmann, Competence Center Smarter Work, ERCIS, Germany
  • Katharina Ebner, University of Hagen, Germany
  • Maike Greve, University of Goettingen, Germany
  • Mathias Kraus, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Michael Leyer, University of Rostock, Germany
  • Mike Preuss, Universiteit Leiden, Netherlands
  • Niklas Kühl, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Pascal Kerschke, Technisch Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Roman Rietsche, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • Sarah Oeste-Reiß, University of Kassel, Germany
  • Scott Thiebes, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Sebastian Lins, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Simon Hacks, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
  • Tobias Scholz, Universität Siegen, Germany
  • Ulrich Gnewuch, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
Track N°5: BABD | Business Analytics and Big Data 

Track Chairs

Track Description

Recent global challenges, such as the COVID 19 crisis, have more than ever revealed the need for united societies overcoming national egoisms and inequalities. In order to achieve this vision, big data and the manifold opportunities to gain insights and generate value by sharing, enriching and analyzing this data constitute an indispensable enabler. The application of business analytics allows us to integrate, analyze, visualize, and ultimately understand and improve the complex processes that make up our digitized world. Such approaches foster the transformation of societies and organizations. With the enthusiasm around business analytics comes responsibility, as analytics can amplify digital divides, trigger affronts to human dignity, and be used to incite distrust rather than unify in solidarity.

This track aims to promote multidisciplinary contributions dealing with organizational, technological, cultural, ethical and societal perspectives and challenges of business analytics. We call for submissions based on quantitative and qualitative work as well as theoretical, design, action, or behavioral research. Furthermore, we encourage papers demonstrating the organizational impact of business analytics and big data in terms of competitive performance, innovativeness, as well as inclusion and community building. Papers solely dealing with AI and machine learning are not the focus of this track.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The role of business intelligence, business analytics, and big data for new horizons in digitally united societies
  • Business analytics for social good
  • Strategic and change management issues stemming from business analytics and big data
  • Business value of business analytics and big data
  • Adoption, routinization, maturity, use, and innovative applications of business analytics and big data
  • Data humanism, data harm and societal implications of datafication
  • Data privacy, data quality, and data governance
  • Opportunities and challenges of sharing data and of open data
  • Data-driven business model innovation, data entrepreneurship, and the digital ecosystem big data
  • Data visualization, visual analytics
  • Process mining and the benefits of robotic process automation

Associate Editors

  • Adir Even, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, IEM, Israel
  • Alexander Maedche, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Arpan Kar, IIT Delhi, India
  • Christian Dremel, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • Christoph Flath, Julius-Maximilians-University of Würzburg, Germany
  • Cristina Trocin, Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskapelige Universitet, Norway
  • Daniel Curto-Millet, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Elisabetta Raguseo, Politecnico di Torino, Italy
  • Gregory Richards, University of Ottawa, Canada
  • Ida Asadi Someh, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Imad Bani Hani, Linnaeus University, Sweden
  • Ivo Blohm, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • John Krogstie, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • John Oredo, University of Nairobi, Kenya
  • Kai Heinrich, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, Germany
  • Konstantin Hopf, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Konstantina Spanaki, Audencia Business School, France
  • Konstantina Valogianni, IE University, Spain
  • Laura Ruiz Santiago, University of Granada, Spain
  • Manjul Gupta, Florida International University, United States
  • Markus Lahtinen, Lund University, Sweden
  • Najmul Islam, LUT University, Finland
  • Natalia Kliewer, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
  • Nuno Laranjeiro, University of Coimbra, Portugal
  • Oliver Mueller, Paderborn University, Germany
  • Olivera Marjanovic, University of Technology Sydney, Australia
  • Patrick Delfmann, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
  • Patrick Zschech, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Ramesh Sharda, Oklahoma State University, United States
  • Rameshwar Dubey Dubey, Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom
  • Rogier Van de Wetering, Open University, Netherlands
  • Roland M. Mueller, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Germany
  • Shijia Gao, Monash University, Australia
  • Stephan Aier, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland
  • Sule Balkan, Information Management, Ameriprise Financial, United States
  • Tobias Brandt, University of Münster, Germany
  • Vasili Mankevich, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • William Yeoh, Deakin University, Australia
  • Yixin Zhang, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Track N°6: BCFIN | Blockchain and FinTech: The development, application and implication of blockchain

Track Chairs

Track Description

FinTech, which refers to the use of novel technologies, such as blockchain and Artificial Intelligence, to design, deliver and optimize financial services, refers to a broad variety of technological interventions within digital finance. Such technological interventions can be applied within 1) private finance such as P2P payment platforms, money remittances, saving accounts, P2P lending platforms, alternative credit scoring, 2) commercial finance such as crowdfunding, WealthTech, PropTech, security trading without human intervention, and 3) operational backbone of traditional financial institutions such as clearing and settlement.

Blockchain/DLT technologies challenge prevailing myths concerning supremacy of centralised computing architectures and offer new opportunities for developing radically new digital financial services. At the same time, the new technology architecture has been criticized as being ‘unnecessary’ or ‘unfit’ to deal with real issues in finance and beyond. Blockchain-based applications in the financial service area include, for example, cryptocurrencies, cross-border payments, underlying blockchain technology architecture (DLT, including Ethereum), smart contracts, and others.

Topics for this track include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Novel approaches to development of blockchain applications
  • Blockchain and other open platform technologies, such as Ethereum, Hyperledger and Corda
  • Blockchain platform governance and standards
  • Cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin, Libra) and ICOs
  • Stable coins and central bank backed digital currencies (CBDC)
  • Combining traditional database approaches and blockchains
  • Emergent payment (e.g., B2B, cross-border) platforms based on blockchain
  • Innovation in Capital Markets (Trading, Crowdfunding, Peer-to-Peer Lending)
  • Use of blockchain in WealthTech, InsurTech and PropTech
  • Regulatory approaches of innovative financial services (regulating ICO, security and utility tokens) and RegTech (AML, security issues)

Associate Editors

  • Alfred Benedikt Brendel, Technisch Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Gerhard Schwabe, University of Zurich, Switzerland
  • José Parra-Moyano, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Kari Koskinen, Aalto University, Finland
  • Liudmila Zavolokina, University of Zurich, Switzerland
  • Livia Norstrom, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Matthew Mullarkey, University of South Florida, United States
  • Svetlana Abramova, University of Innsbruck, Austria
  • Yi Ding, Warwick Business School, United Kingdom
Track N°7: BCTOKEC | The Token Economy – Blockchain Applications beyond FinTech

Track Chairs

Track Description

Distributed ledger technologies enable the creation of cryptographic tokens, namely representations of tangible (e.g., real estate) or intangible (e.g., patent) assets as tokens that are easy to create and trade. A multitude of potential use cases are currently envisioned and pilots are tested. However, numerous technical, organizational and legal hurdles still exist which impede the widespread adoption of a token economy. Furthermore, acceptance among non-institutional end users is still low.

The emergence of a token economy thus leads to numerous important questions, ranging from a critical evaluation of the capabilities and limitations of tokens from a technical perspective to the transformation of economic and societal structures through the tokenization of business processes, real-world assets, and property rights. Additionally, legal and trust issues exist, which are exacerbated by the borderless nature of blockchain technologies.

To address these challenges, this track calls for academic research on blockchain-based tokens and their potential technical, economic and social implications. We invite innovative and relevant empirical (qualitative and quantitative) studies as well as design-oriented research and conceptual/theoretical papers. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Token valuation, taxonomy, governance, voting, and regulation
  • Token economy and new forms of economic organizing (e.g., cooperatives, decentralized platforms, public good provision)
  • Token-based business models (e.g., non-fungible tokens) and use cases beyond finance
  • Institutional and user acceptance of tokens
  • Factors influencing the success of token-based business models
  • The role and impact of tokens on venture capital (e.g., ICOs, STOs, IEOs)
  • Macroeconomic implications of the token economy
  • Incentive theory, mechanism design, contract theory for tokenization Security and privacy issues of tokens
  • Cross-ledger interoperability
  • Standardized tokens as network goods and source of value creation
  • The impact of tokens on (de)centralization and transaction costs
  • Sustainability implications of the token economy

Associate Editors

  • Andranik Tumasjan, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany
  • Arthur Carvalho, Miami University, United States
  • Fatemeh Saadatmand, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Frank Teuteberg, Osnabrück University, Germany
  • Gilbert Fridgen, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
  • Harris Kyriakou, ESSEC Business School, France
  • Heman Subramanian, Florida International University, United States
  • Jens Grossklags, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Jonas Andersen, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • José Parra-Moyano, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Luis Araujo, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Mayur Joshi, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Ms. Schirrmacher, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Nadine Ostern, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland
  • Nils Urbach, Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences, Germany
  • Nirmalee Raddatz, University of Memphis, United States
  • Raffaele Ciriello, University of Sydney, Australia
  • Shruti Kashyap, Uppsala University, Sweden
  • Venkata Marella, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Track N°8: BMDT | Business Models and Digital Transformation

Track Chairs

Track Description

In a growing number of industries, new paths of value creation are enabled by the development of information and communication technologies (ICT). To remain competitive, companies use ICT to transform their existing business models or to facilitate new ones. These digital transformations often affect large parts of organizations, leading to far-reaching changes in the economy and society. Therefore, it is important to understand ICT-enabled changes in value creation and realization, exchanges and combinations of resources, delivery of new digital services and products, process innovation, and thus, new digital business models (Hedman and Kalling 2003). In line with the conference theme, companies also have to monitor the impact on society, including ethical implications, of their business models and transformation choices to ensure long-term success.

As an established part of ECIS since 2014, this track will examine the impact of technological developments on the design of business models (Veit et al. 2014). Furthermore, the track also invites submissions that focus on how companies can successfully manage the digital transformation process (Matt et al. 2015). Submissions are encouraged from all theoretical and methodological perspectives drawing from IS, strategic management, and related disciplines.

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • ICT as “enabler” of new business models
  • Digital transformation of existing business models
  • Changes in cost structures or revenue generation through ICT
  • Effects of ICT on the organizational structure
  • Management of digital transformation processes and leadership concepts
  • Development and implementation of digital transformation strategies
  • Corporate and entrepreneurial culture in the digital age
  • Development of digital competencies within companies
  • The impact of ICT on the relationship between firms and their stakeholders
  • Sustainable digital transformation and organizational performance

Associate Editors

  • Adrian Yeow, Singapore University of Social Sciences, Singapore
  • Alexander Benlian, Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany
  • Ana Ortiz de Guinea, HEC Montréal, Canada
  • Antonia Köster, University of Potsdam, Germany
  • Arne Buchwald, Vlerick Business School, Belgium
  • Bendik Bygstad, University Of Oslo, Norway
  • Benedikt Berger, University of Münster, Germany
  • Daniel Veit, University of Augsburg, Germany
  • Dennis Steininger, Technical University of Kaiserslautern, Germany
  • Felix Wortmann, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • Gregory Vial, HEC Montréal, Canada
  • Jan Stockhinger, University of Münster, Germany
  • Joseph Nwankpa, Miami University, United States
  • Miranda Kajtazi, Lund University, Sweden
  • Oktay Turetken, Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands
  • Paul Alpar, University at Marburg, Germany
  • Peter Loos, Saarland University, Institute for Information Systems, Germany
  • Philip O’Reilly, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Philipp Ebel, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • Philipp Wunderlich, Reutlingen University, Germany
  • Stefan Koch, Johannes Kepler University, Austria
  • Virpi Tuunainen, Aalto University, Finland
  • William Baber, Kyoto University, Japan
Track N°9: BPMDI | Business Process Management in the Digital Age

Track Chairs

Track Description

We invite contributions that explore the relationship between business process management and digital innovation. The rapid uptake of fast maturing digital technologies such as mobile, social, cognitive, and cloud computing have sig-nificant, but still poorly understood implications for the design, automation and overall management of business processes. We are interested in how business process management can foster digital innovation activities, and in turn, how digital innovation changes the way we think about the design and management business process work.

We welcome conceptual and empirical studies, and encourage interdisciplinary research. Selected papers will be invited to be submitted as extended versions to the BPM department of the Business & Information Systems Engineering journal for fast-track review process.

Submissions to this track may address questions such as (but are not limited to) the following:

  • How does digital innovation challenge our established assumptions about business process management?
  • How do emergent digital technologies support digital innovation activi-ties in the context of business process management?
  • How can we enable agile process designs for highly uncertain business environments?
  • (How) do we need to rethink the notion of a business process in the con-text of digital platforms and ecosystems?
  • How do critical ‘human-centric’ aspects (such as governance, capability building, adoption success) play a role in the BPM-Digital space?
  • How can we enable and balance exploitative and explorative BPM ac-tivities?
  • What is the impact of digital technologies–such as RPA, blockchain, process mining and IoT–on process design and management?
  • How can we use various types of data to analyze, improve and proto-type business processes?

Submissions on other BPM-related topics are also welcome.

Associate Editors

  • Adela Del Río Ortega, Universidad de Sevilla, Spain
  • Adriano Augusto, University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Amy Van Looy, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Anna Maria Oberländer, FIM Research Center, University of Bayreuth , Germany
  • Christian Janiesch, TU Dortmund University, Germany
  • Gregor Polancic, University of Maribor, Slovenia
  • Henrik Leopold, Kühne Logistics University, Germany
  • Irene Vanderfeesten, Open University of the Netherlands, Netherlands
  • Jan Recker, University of Hamburg, Germany
  • Jan vom Brocke, University of Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein
  • Karin Väyrynen, University of Oulu, Finland
  • Luise Pufahl, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Germany
  • Michael Rosemann, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
  • Mieke Jans, Hasselt University, Belgium
  • Mojca Indihar Štemberger, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • Peter Trkman, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • Ralf Plattfaut, Fachhochschule Südwestfalen, Germany
  • Rehan Syed, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
  • Waldemar Kremser, Radboud University, Netherlands
Track N°10: COGHB | Cognition and Human Behavior in Information Systems

Track Chairs

Track Description

New personalized, consumerized and human-centric information systems emerge and digitally unite people, enterprises and societies more than ever before. These information systems bring many advantages but are also associated with adverse effects especially at the individual level. Being overwhelmed with information and requests to adapt to new technologies often impedes focusing on relevant information and may even lead to attention deficit. This may be worsened by multitasking on various devices and constantly interacting with a smartphone. Thus, information systems need to integrate cognitive and emotional aspects for preparing the individual to be of support in a digitally united society.

We invite contributions on the design and use of information systems that reflect cognitive implications, requirements and consequences at the individual level. Cognitive considerations in guiding or “nudging” users’ choices become relevant e.g., by encouraging people to behave socially and environmentally responsible or to adopt a healthier lifestyle. Furthermore, contributions are invited that provide understanding of how digital technology shapes human cognition and emotion and investigates how user interact with technology and algorithms. We welcome novel qualitative and quantitative empirical insights and conceptual research contributing to theory development and offering directions for future research. We especially encourage research grounded in reference disciplines such as cognitive psychology, human computer interaction, neuroscience, or automated cognition.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • effects of digital technologies on human behavior at the individual level
  • shaping cognition, emotion and behavior through emergent technology (e.g., virtual reality, augmented reality, persuasive system design)
  • user interaction with algorithms, algorithm aversion, and algorithm appreciation
  • cognitive biases and heuristics in the context of novel digital technologies
  • differences in user behavior and cognitive processes when using different devices (smartphones, PCs, tablets), smartphones as our “extended mind”
  • online persuasion and deception (e.g., fake news, fake reviews, manipulative e-commerce strategies)
  • design of information systems for digital nudging in various domains (e.g., online shopping, online donations, privacy settings, crowdsourcing and funding, energy consumption, choice of healthy products)
  • cognitive mechanisms underlying persuasive system design
  • neuroIS studies on information systems design and use (i.e., neurocognition, neurophysiology, eye tracking)
  • cognitive overload and technostress caused by interruptions and consumption of information through digital devices
  • fostering creativity in digital settings
  • evaluation of user experience and user attitudes of innovative interaction designs
  • cognitive requirements and consequences of human-centric design of information systems

Associate Editors

  • Alexander Kupfer, University of Innsbruck, Austria
  • Aliaksei Miniukovich, University of Innsbruck, Austria
  • Alireza Nili, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
  • Alper Beşer, Technische Universität Dortmund, Germany
  • Anna Moker, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Annamina Rieder, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland
  • Christian Leyh, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Christiane Lehrer, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Christine Bauer, Utrecht University, Netherlands
  • Constantin Houy, Saarland University, Germany
  • Daniel Schnurr, University of Passau, Germany
  • James Burleson, California Polytechnic State University, United States
  • Jason Watson, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
  • Kamel Rouibah, Kuwait University, Kuwait
  • Maria Madlberger, Webster Vienna Private University, Austria
  • Nicolas Pröllochs, University of Giessen, Germany
  • Patrick Zschech, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Rajendra Bandi, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India
  • Reinhard Greulich, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Roozmehr Safi, University of Missouri-Kansas City, United States
  • Saman Bina, Baylor University, United States
  • Sascha Lichtenberg, Technisch Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Sofia Sherman, The Academic College of Tel-Aviv, Israel
  • Steffi Haag, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Stephan Schlögl, MCI – The Entrepreneurial University, Austria
  • Sybren de Kinderen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
  • Valerie Graf-Drasch, Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology FIT, Germany
  • Victoria Reibenspiess, Washington State University, United States
Track N°11: DIGEI | Digitization of Education, Private Industries, and Society

Track Chairs

Track Description

Recent developments in digital technology have reshaped almost all aspects of our lives: our education, our work, and our social life. Despite the benefits afforded by digital technologies, they often produce challenges that the academic community cannot ignore. This track aims to not only elucidate the opportunities that accompany digitization, but also to reflect on how the information systems community can aid in tackling the challenges brought about by digitization. Essentially, the goal of this track is to raise awareness and generate scholarly debate about the opportunities and challenges for fostering digital inclusion in our increasingly interconnected world. Not only are diversity, equity, and inclusion instrumental in assuring fairness in society and assimilating communities, they also drive the proliferation of skillsets fundamental to the realization of a truly digital society in the foreseeable future. Although the role digital technology plays in society has received attention in the past couple of years, research in this area is still rather fragmented. We do not yet have a coherent body of literature that theorizes about the consequences of digital technology on individuals, communities, and the broader society.

This track closely aligns with the conference theme, Human Values Crisis in a Digitizing World, in its aspiration for a more just society, in which digital technology constitutes an integral component. This track also considers technology-related topics touching on the intersections between age, culture, disabilities, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status, and how they relate to education, industries, and society in general.

We welcome submissions – either as full research or research in progress papers – that analyze the equalizing role digital technology plays in different aspects of contemporary life. Submissions could include theory development, literature reviews, or practical teaching cases from various research traditions, including qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods, or design science.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Opportunities and challenges of digitizing of education, industries, and society
  • Equality, diversity, and inclusion in technology-enabled education, industries, and society
  • Ethics of digitization of education, industries, and society
  • Digital transformation and the future of work
  • Technology-aided social inclusion
  • Online learning platforms for digital inclusion
  • Digital inclusion of marginalized groups
  • Inclusion/exclusion dichotomy of social media
  • Political freedoms in the digital space
  • Humane computing
  • Policy and regulations for promoting inclusiveness
  • Bridging diversity or inclusivity gaps through digital technologies

Associate Editors

  • Amy Connolly, James Madison University, United States
  • Anuragini Shirish, Institut Mines Télécom Business School, France
  • Arman Sadreddin, Concordia University, Canada
  • Dawn Owens, University of Texas at Dallas, United States
  • Deanna House, University of Nebraska Omaha, United States
  • Eric Lim, UNSW Sydney, Australia
  • Fangfang Hou, Nottingham University Business School China, China
  • Gergana Vladova, University of Potsdam, Germany
  • Hamid Nikkhah, Bentley University, United States
  • Hongxiu Li, Tampere University, Finland
  • Maximilian Schreieck, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Pitso Tsibolane, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Qiqi Jiang, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Silvia Masiero, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University , United States
  • Tatiana Ermakova, Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems, Germany
  • Ulrika H. Westergren, Umea University, Sweden
  • Zhao Cai, Nottingham University Business School China, China
Track N°12: DRMIS | Design Research and Methods in Information Systems

Track Chairs

Track Description

Information systems (IS) have become a pervasive element in private, organizational, and societal contexts. Thereby, humans constantly adjust to emerging technological developments against the backdrop of changes in political, economic, and health circumstances. Similarly, system engineers need to consider the design, implementation, and evaluation of novel artefacts in highly dynamic environments. Especially human values, such as diversity, equity, fairness, and inclusion have gained increasing importance in the design of computing artefacts. These values are vital in the IS research community’s pursuit of exploring new horizons for digitally united societies.

Design research in IS is concerned with informing the design of artefacts by establishing and applying (design) theories, exploring and testing models, providing design guidelines, as well as designing and evaluating computing artefacts. This track stimulates that extends the scientific knowledge base for design research in IS in general and for a digitally united society in particular. We seek research that produces design knowledge about computing artefacts for addressing real-world problems, methodological contributions for designing such systems, and knowledge about the implications of specific design elements. We welcome a diversity of submissions focusing on designing, developing, and evaluating artefacts, adding to the theoretical and methodological knowledge base of design research.

Suggested Topics:

  • Behavior design, gamification, and persuasive systems
  • Conversational interfaces, chatbots, and digital assistants
  • Design processes, principles and evaluation of design, modularity in design in information systems, and theorizing in design science research
  • Design science and cross-disciplinary research
  • Emerging methods and tools for design science research
  • Ethics and legal aspects in design science research
  • Considering emotion, flow, and technostress in information systems design
  • Using NeuroIS methods and tools for the design of neuroadaptive systems and interfaces
  • Participatory design and human-centered design of information systems
  • Usability and user experience (UX) engineering

This track is sponsored by AIS SIGHCI. High quality and relevant papers from this track will be considered for selection for fast-tracked development towards publication in AIS Transaction on Human-Computer Interaction (https://aisel.aisnet.org/thci/). Selected papers will need to expand in content and length in line with the requirements for standard research articles published in the journal. Although the track co-chairs are committed to guiding the selected papers towards final publication, further reviews may be needed before final publication decision can be made.

Associate Editors

  • Alfred Benedikt Brendel, Technisch Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Andreas Drechsler, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Debra VanderMeer, Florida International University, United States
  • Dominik Gutt, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Eva Bittner, University of Hamburg, Germany
  • Hannes Rothe, ICN Business School, Germany
  • Isabelle Wattiau Wattiau, ESSEC Business School, France
  • Leona Chandra-Kruse, University of Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein
  • Mala Kaul, University of Nevada, United States
  • Matthias Soellner, University of Kassel, Germany
  • Milena Head, McMaster University, Canada
  • Monica Tremblay, The College of William and Mary, United States
  • Robert Winter, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland
  • Sofia Schöbel, Osnabrück University, Germany
  • Timm Teubner, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Germany
  • Ulrich Gnewuch, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
Track N°13: ENTMOD | Enterprise Modelling

Track Chairs

Track Description

The purpose of this track is to focus on a core topic in business and information systems engineering research. Enterprise modelling is an established approach for the conceptual representation, design, implementation and analysis of information systems in general and the support of human communication. It contributes with the conceptualization, implementation, and use of machine-processable languages to facilitate the interaction with complex business and technological scenarios, engage in knowledge management and support organizational engineering. In addition, the development of reference models for selected domains, the design of generic models for enterprise architecture management, and the development of modelling tools are investigated. Enterprise Modelling supports the creation of innovative digital solutions and thus to investigate new horizons for our society in terms of human value-driven digitalization.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Conceptualization of enterprise modelling methods
  • Enterprise modelling platforms & tools
  • Enterprise modelling for disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence and distributed ledger technologies
  • Semantic-based enterprise modelling and enterprise ontologies
  • Enterprise architecture modelling
  • Multi-level enterprise modelling
  • Enterprise modelling for human value-driven digitalization
  • Enterprise modelling for business ecosystems and enterprise architecture
  • Best practices and use cases

Arrangements for subsequent journal publications will be sought after with the BISE Journal (Department Enterprise Modeling and Business Ecosystems) and the EMISAJ Journal.

Associate Editors

  • Agnes Koschmider, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany
  • Andreas Opdahl, University of Bergen, Norway
  • Dominik Bork, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
  • Geert Poels, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Georg Grossmann, University of South Australia, Australia
  • Henderik A. Proper, Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology, Luxembourg
  • John Krogstie, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • Kurt Sandkuhl, University of Rostock, Germany
  • Moonkun Lee, Jeonbuk National University, Korea
  • Peter Fettke, DFKI, Germany
  • Stefan Strecker, University of Hagen, Germany
  • Stephan Aier, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland
Track N°14: ETHIC | Social and Ethical Implications of ICT Use

Track Chairs

Track Description

This track aims to develop theoretical and practical insights into issues related to social and ethical implications of information and communication technology (ICT) use, with the goal to thrive towards a sustainable and digitally-enabled future. This track thus aligns with the ECIS 2022 conference theme of “New Horizons in Digitally United Societies.”

We welcome papers that address knowledge gaps in: (1) the nature of the problem under investigation, (2) negative aspects associated with the problem, and (3) solutions that can mitigate the problem.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Undesirable/unintended use of ICTs: Cyberbullying, addiction, polarisation, vigilantism, mis/disinformation, illegitimate surveillance, online extremism, activism, etc.
  • Societal issues of current and emerging ICTs on labour market: Unemployment, deskilling, substitution, algorithmic biases and discrimination, etc.
  • Responsible use of ICTs: Ethical ICT governance, ethical guidelines for ICT application, societal concerns in ICT planning and governance, etc.
  • (Un)ethical uses of ICTs and the data they generate in elections, organisations, marketing, etc.
  • Digital inclusion/exclusion, equality/inequality, wellbeing, literacy
  • ICT-based prevention and intervention strategies for social and ethical issues

The track is open to all methodological approaches. We invite both full research and research-in-progress papers.

Associate Editors

  • Aaron Cheng, London School of Economics, United Kingdom
  • Ayoung Suh, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea
  • Barney Tan, University of Sydney, Australia
  • Bart Knijnenburg, Clemson University, United States
  • Ben Choi, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • Carmen LEONG, University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Dan Pienta, Baylor University, United States
  • Dimitra Skoumpopoulou, Northumbria University, United Kingdom
  • Randy Wong, The University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • Ruba Aljafari, University of Pittsburgh, United States
  • Sangseok You, HEC Paris, France
  • Snehasish Banerjee, University of York, United Kingdom
  • Thomas Widjaja, University of Passau, Germany
  • Wenxi Pu, University of Manitoba, Canada
  • Xiao-Liang Shen, Wuhan University, China
  • Yong Liu, Aalto University School of Business, Finland
  • Younghoon Chang Chang, Beijing Institute of Technology, China
Track N°15: HEALTH | Health Information Technology and IS for Healthcare

Track Chairs

Track Description

Globally, healthcare systems are struggling with the monumental challenges of providing quality care to a growing, aging population, as well as facilitating the monitoring and management of exponentially increasing chronic diseases such as diabetes or obesity and trying to stem exponentially increasing costs to deliver quality care and access.

Health IT is expected to deliver a measurable impact on managing these challenges. However, to date, evidence is scarce as to whether Health IT lives up to the promise and the expected benefits from IT have yet to be realized.

This track seeks conceptual, empirical and design science research and research in progress papers that enhance our knowledge on any and all facets of Health IT.

We specifically look for papers dealing with:

  • the challenges of the ageing population
  • well-being / wellness-tourism / medical-tourism
  • mobile Health solutions and electronic assists

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Behavior changing digital interventions and persuasive technology
  • Telemedicine and telehealth and their impacts on health and economic outputs
  • Adoption, diffusion, and assimilation of health information systems
  • Wearable health devices and their health outcomes
  • Virtual Communities and their impact on patient empowerment and patient safety.
  • User-Generated Content and its impact on healthcare practices and providers
  • Health IT for the physically and cognitively challenged
  • Design and implementation of health information technologies
  • Evaluations of EMR, EHR or PHR solutions
  • Privacy and security of health information
  • Healthcare analytics and corresponding data visualization
  • Specific IT/IS adoption and usage patterns of the elderly
  • Digital health platforms and communities for the elderly
  • The impact of technology usage on well-being of the elderly
  • Theories and research frameworks for investigating age-related IS phenomena
  • Methodological challenges of investigating elderly people’s technology usage
  • Impact of technology training on elderly’s perceptions and behaviors
  • Effective design of digital technologies for elderly people
  • Computer and IT-related self-efficacy of the elderly
  • Understanding of elderly people’s technology needs, expectations, and requirements
  • User interface design, usability and accessibility issues
  • Integration of elderly people in the design of technology
  • Non-intrusive or minimally intrusive surveillance for independent living
  • Design requirements for technologies supporting independent living
  • Medication management, compliance, training, and safety for independent living
  • Visions for future technologies for elderly people
  • IOT technologies for assisted living
  • Meta-analyses and meta-syntheses of research on elderly people and IS
  • IT-Security for elderly people (esp. phishing, scamming etc.)
  • Trust and distrust of elderly people in digital technologies
  • How IT has enabled and supported patient-centered value-based care
  • Social Media for the elderly
  • Patient-, caregiver-, -guardian, and clinician-centric design methods
  • Convergence and management of consumer and medical devices, informatics, and systems

Associate Editors

  • Abdur Rahim Mohammad Forkan, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
  • Alex Wang, Murdoch University, Australia
  • Amirhossein Eslami Andargoli, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
  • Andy Weeger, University of Applied Sciences Neu-Ulm, Germany
  • Angela Yu, Renmin University of China, China
  • Anne-Katrin Witte, University of Hagen, Germany
  • Blooma John, University of Canberra, Australia
  • Heinz-Theo Wagner, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Indrit Troshani, University of Adelaide, Australia
  • Iris Reychav, Ariel University, Israel
  • Jessica Ochmann, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • Jörg Leukel, University of Hohenheim, Germany
  • Juergen Seitz, Duale Hochschule Baden-Württemberg Heidenheim, Germany
  • Kathy Ning Shen, Harir Group, United Arab Emirates
  • Kourosh Dadgar, University of San Francisco, United States
  • Lauri Wessel, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
  • Maximilian Haug, Neu-Ulm University of Applied Sciences, Germany
  • Mirou Jaana, University of Ottawa, Canada
  • Navin Sewberath Misser, HU University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands
  • Oliver Posegga, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Philipp Brune, Neu-Ulm University of Applied Sciences, Germany
  • Prem Prakash Jayaraman, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
  • Roxana Ologeanu-Taddei, University of Montpellier, France
  • Sam Zaza, Middle Tennessee State University, United States
  • Sebastian Schuetz, Florida International University, United States
  • Tobias Kowatsch, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
  • Tobias Mettler, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Wolfgang Maass, Saarland University, Germany
  • Xi Zhang, Tianjin University, China
  • Zhongyun Zhou, Tongji University, China
Track N°16: ISIAD | IS Innovation, Adoption and Diffusion

Track Chairs

Track Description

When the technology acceptance model (TAM) was developed (Davis 1989), computers were unfamiliar to many. At that time, the technologies were designed to automate administrative and transactional work, typically by utilizing large enterprise systems. Today, digital technologies are permeating every aspect of our work, lives, and societies. With an unrelenting pace of technological innovation, emerging information systems and technologies, including smartphones, social media, artificial intelligence, wearable devices, Internet of things, and digital agents, are continuously evolving and being used in organizational, societal and personal contexts.

While these digital innovations have been infusing and reshaping organizational operations, societies and individuals’ lives, many of the theoretical perspectives fall short of understanding these new contexts, having been derived from the time when computers were new and unknown to many. Hence, the rapid digital innovation provides opportunities to discuss and rethink the theoretical underpinnings and methodologies that demand novel approaches to understand how individuals, organizations and societies adopt, adapt to and use these new information systems and technologies. Therefore, we encourage contributions that use new theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to study technology adoption, use, diffusion and infusion phenomena. Studies using conceptual, analytical, design-oriented, or empirical approaches are welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Organizational, societal and individual adoption, use and discontinuance of digital technologies
  • Factors enabling or inhibiting acceptance and use of digital technologies
  • New perspectives on mandated, expected and voluntary use of digital technologies
  • Positive and negative consequences of digital technologies for organizations, societies and individuals
  • Digital technologies for organizations, individuals, and societies
  • New theoretical perspectives on, and methodological approaches to study acceptance, use, diffusion and infusion of digital technologies
  • Multidisciplinary perspectives on acceptance, use, diffusion and infusion of digital technologies

This track and the suggested topics align well with the ECIS 2022 conference theme on New Horizons in Digitally United Societies. It provides a platform for scholarly exchanges on research of adoption, use, diffusion and infusion of digital technologies and innovations that apply new theoretical underpinnings and methodological approaches to studying their use, as well as their positive and negative consequences.

Associate Editors

  • Anand Jeyaraj, Wright State University, United States
  • Andreas Eckhardt, University of Innsbruck, Austria
  • Andrew Schwarz, Louisiana State University, United States
  • Carol Hsu, University of Sydney, Australia
  • Christian Maier, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Felix Tan, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
  • Hanlie Smuts, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Heinz-Theo Wagner, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Heshan Sun, University of Oklahoma, United States
  • Hugo Lam, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • Po-An Hsieh, Georgia State University, United States
  • Jennifer Claggett, Wake Forest University, United States
  • Jose Benitez, EDHEC Business School, France
  • Lesley Land, The University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Melody Zou, University of Warwick, United Kingdom
  • Mike Dinger, University of South Carolina Upstate, United States
  • Nelly Todorova, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Oliver Posegga, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Sander Zwanenburg, University of Otago, New Zealand
  • Yi-Te Chiu, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Zeeshan Bhatti, University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom
Track N°17: ISDPM | IS Development and Project Management

Track Chairs

Track Description

The practices, organization, and management of IS Development (ISD) have been core research topics from the very beginning of the Information Systems discipline. However, IS development still struggles with time and budget overruns, and failure to meet functionality and quality targets. The context, technologies, and application domains of ISD furthermore continue to change. New software development approaches, software platforms, and operating contexts digitize the delivery cycle and pose new questions as to how to organize and manage projects and ISD organizations. Phenomena such as agile development, IT platforms, (X)aaS, DevOps, Continuous Development and Deployment, change the composition and operation of IS projects, programmes and departments. Developments in data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence affect team learning and knowledge sharing, mediate collaboration, or even let machines be new actors in project teams.

ISD research has examined IS development from many perspectives, including ISD methods and practices, risk management, organizational learning, top management roles, and ISD and project management methodologies. The current developments in ISD lead us to revisit old, as well as study new themes arising on the horizon of ISD.
This track welcomes papers that improve our understanding of IT and ISD projects, on the societal, organizational, group, and individual levels.

The best Paper(s) from the track will be fast tracked for publication in the Project Management Journal.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Management of IT projects and software development ecosystems
  • Selection and combined use of ISD approaches; e.g.; agile, traditional, continuous
  • DevOps; Continuous development and deployment
  • IT project team dynamics: collaboration, communication, conflict resolution, inter-team dynamics
  • HR topics in IT project teams: recruitment/selection, development/training, turnover, team composition, well-being, commitment.
  • Digital Innovation projects
  • ISD and management in distributed and virtual teams
  • Governance, risk management and compliance for IT projects
  • Leadership, coordination, and control perspectives on IT projects
  • Socio-technical aspects of IS development and project management

Associate Editors

  • Andreas Drechsler, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Brad McKenna, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom
  • Diane Strode, Wellington Institute of Technology – Whitireia, New Zealand
  • Gerard De Leoz, University of Tampa, United States
  • Hameed Chughtai, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
  • Han-fen Hu, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States
  • Jan Jöhnk, Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology FIT, Germany
  • Jeffrey Tai, Coventry University, United Kingdom
  • John Stouby Persson, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Kai Spohrer, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, Germany
  • Kevin CARILLO, Toulouse Business School, France
  • Lesley Land, The University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Lise Heeager, Aarhus University, Denmark
  • Maduka Subasinghage, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
  • Michael Wessel, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Mohammad Moeini, Warwick Business School, United Kingdom
  • Neil Chueh-An Lee, National Chiayi University, Taiwan
  • Paul Drews, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany
  • Phil Hennel, University of Cologne, Germany
  • Stephen McCarthy, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Xiaodan Yu, University of International Business and Economics, China
  • Yide Shen, Rowan University, United States
Track N°18: KMDI | Knowledge Management and Digitization

Track Chairs

Track Description

Digitalization currently changes the business world as well as the society as whole. In this regard, knowledge is still and will play an even more important role in the future as this resource is a source of organizational value creation. Over the last years, we also witnessed that more and more digital technologies (e.g., conversational agents, AI) rely on externalized organizational knowledge to support knowledge workers in their tasks or even autonomously perform specific tasks.

This track raises the question whether and how digitalization in general changes the socio-technical aspects related to managing organizational knowledge. At the same time, this track also questions how organizational knowledge should be created, managed, used, and protected to reach new horizons in the digitalization of KM.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  1. Requirements of digitalization towards KM and design of KM systems
  2.  Knowledge risks arising from digitalization
  3. Social, behavioral and cultural issues in the context of KM and digitalization
  4. KM and technology enhanced learning
  5. KM and innovation
  6. KM and conversational agents
  7. KM and gamification
  8. AI for technology-mediated social collaboration
  9. Knowledge life cycle and data-driven decision support
  10. Support for mature KM solutions: KM governance, KM strategies, KM maturity models, and KM performance and value
  11. Impact of crises (e.g., COVID19) on KM and digitalization

Associate Editors

  • Angela Fessl, Know-Center research center for data-driven business and big data analytics, Austria
  • Eric Schoop, Technisch Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Franz Lehner, University of Passau, Germany
  • Ilona Ilvonen, Tampere University, Finland
  • Jan Pawlowski, Hochschule Ruhr West , Germany
  • Lena Waizenegger, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
  • Markus Bick, ESCP Business School, Germany
  • Matthias Murawski, ESCP Europe Business School, Germany
  • Murray Jennex, San Diego State University, United States
  • Nora Nahr, University of Passau, Germany
  • Ronald Maier, University of Innsbruck, Austria
  • Sofia Schöbel, Osnabrück University, Germany
  • Tyge Kummer, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
  • Viktoria Pammer-Schindler, Graz University of Technology, Austria
Track N°19: OPENIT | Openness and IT

Track Chairs

Track Description

Open IT systems describe a wide range of platforms, concepts, and practices. At the heart of these systems is the desire to break down traditional barriers to participation and overcome antiquated structures. This allows people, knowledge, and resources to move and interact more freely, creating new opportunities inside and outside of organizations. This can allow individuals, organizations, markets, and societies to form new relationships and work collectively towards shared goals and develop innovative new solutions for complex problems.

Such collaborations inevitably present new challenges, as scholars seek to understand and design systems capable of balancing (i) the need to accommodate sustained communities versus the need for dynamic participation (ii) the need to accommodate contrasting values, interests, and motivations. Thus, we invite applied, empirical and theoretical research papers that will contribute to our scholarly understanding of openness and IT.

The track was part of ECIS from 2013 to 2020 consecutively. We believe the track is an especially good fit with the conference theme in 2021 because the openness of IT solutions and the openness of society are increasingly important at the time of crisis and when human values are threatened. The track contributes to a better understanding of how to build open IT solutions to support open society. A journal special issue/section is under consideration.

10 Topics of interest to the track:

  • Open goods and services markets (e.g., open trading environments, sharing economies, etc.)
  • Open finance (crowdfunding, peer-to-peer lending, cryptocurrencies, etc.)
  • Open innovation (e.g., crowdsourcing, innovation contests, co-creation, etc.)
  • Open management and policy-making (e.g. intra-organisation adoption of open principles, distributed consensus systems, etc.)
  • Open computing platforms (e.g., open APIs, open data, developer ecosystems, etc.)
  • Open production methods (e.g., open source software, open hardware, microwork, etc.)
  • Open content strategies (e.g. wikis, social questions and answers, etc.)
  • Open science and scholarship (e.g., citizen science, open access publishing, open data sets, open educational resources, etc.)
  • Open societies and cultures (e.g., open IT for developing regions, digital democracies, hacker/maker and other participatory sub-cultures, social media and crisis response, etc.)
  • Openness as an abstract concept (e.g., frameworks and theories of openness) and research object (e.g. innovative methodological approaches).

Associate Editors

  • Cathal Doyle, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Ciara Fitzgerald, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Gaye Kiely, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Ivo Blohm, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • Jorge Melegati, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy
  • José Parra-Moyano, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Kevin CARILLO, Toulouse Business School, France
  • Mario Schaarschmidt, Paderborn University, Germany
  • Matt Levy, Hawaii Pacific University, United States
  • Michael Cahalane, The University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Sine Zambach, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Stephen McCarthy, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Tadhg Nagle, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Tawfiq Alashoor, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Yi Liu, Rennes School of Business, France
Track N°20: SIEMA | Service Science and Information Systems

Track Chairs

Track Description

This track aims to integrate research perspectives from service science and information systems (IS) to examine how digital technology transforms service systems. Service science is a boundary-spanning and inherently interdisciplinary field that aims to analyze and design service systems, which are configurations of value co-creating actors, in order to advance service innovation in society more broadly. The IS discipline contributed to service science since its inception about 15 years ago. Today, IS focusses on the potential of digital technologies to make service systems increasingly data-driven, smarter, resource-efficient, interconnected and customer-oriented. As such, service science research within the IS discipline contributes to the development of new horizons in terms of a global and digitally connected service society.

We call for relevant and rigorous research that reaches beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries. The interdisciplinary nature of Service Science supports diversity of research paradigms, including theoretical, empirical and design science. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital service design
  • Data-driven service innovation
  • New service business models
  • Smart services and smart service systems
  • Digital servitization of manufacturing
  • Service innovation processes, concepts, studies, and theory
  • Information systems and service strategies
  • Service systems theory
  • Service networks and service ecosystems
  • Modelling of services and service systems

Associate Editors

  • Anna Maria Oberländer, University of Bayreuth , Germany
  • Beverungen Daniel, University of Paderborn, Germany
  • Christoph Peters, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
  • Gerhard Satzger, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Hannes Rothe, ICN Business School, Germany
  • Jorge Grenha Teixeira, University of Porto, Portugal
  • Lauri Wessel, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
  • Martin Semmann, University of Hamburg, Germany
  • Michael Leyer, University of Rostock, Germany
  • Paul Maglio, UC Merced, United States
  • Sebastian Bräuer, University of Hildesheim, Germany
  • Terence Saldanha, University of Georgia, United States
  • Thomas Widjaja, University of Passau, Germany
Track N°21: SMDC | Social Media and Digital Collaboration

Track Chairs

Track Description

Social media have become part of the work and life of billions of humans around the globe. Social media platforms facilitate paradigm shifts in the ways we develop relationships, communicate with each other, collaborate, procure goods and services, and exchange information. They allow anyone to virtually share information with a global audience that becomes, in line with the conference theme, digitally united.

The ubiquitous nature of social media use requires a better understanding of the role and long-term consequences of this phenomenon for digital transformation on individual, organizational and societal levels.

On the one hand, proponents argue that social media promote creation of social capital, result in increased interconnectedness, or facilitate empowerment. On the other hand, opponents express strong concerns over the dangers of social media. The sheer quantity and the sensitivity of the information users disclose gives rise to strong privacy concerns. Other undesirable developments include distraction, addiction, depression, mood disorders. In companies the multivocality, afforded by social media, can yield tensions for organizational coherence. Finally, the phenomenon of fake news has recently emerged as a dangerous development, posing significant challenges for platform providers and users. Considering both positive and negative impacts of social media, managers and policy-makers find themselves confronted with a complex choice of whether these platforms should be regulated and, if so, how. The twitter-ban of sitting US president Donald Trump can be seen as a, very recent, milestone in this context.

This track seeks submissions examining the role social media is playing in transforming the networked society and businesses at large. We especially encourage research that reaches out beyond IS theories, is grounded in multiple reference disciplines and applies new intriguing perspectives to document and understand the transformatory impact of social media and social media-related smartphone use.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Social media and theories about digital collaboration
  • Digital leadership and virtual teams
  • Social channels of enterprise knowledge sharing and collaborative work
  • Co-existence and interweaving of different online and offline (social) communication networks in companies
  • Blurring boundaries of private and business (e.g. Consumerization, Shadow IT)
  • Social media-enabled business models
  • Organizational networking with social media and collaboration technologies
  • User behaviour on social media and collaboration platforms
  • Success and “health” of online social communities
  • Socialness of and in social media and collaboration platforms
  • The development and use of social media analytics
  • Digital methods for understanding social media collaboration (e.g. design science approaches, the computational turn; big data methods)
  • Critical perspectives on social media (e.g. social and information overload; technostress).
  • Social media and fake news

Associate Editors

  • Amir Zadeh, Wright State University, United States
  • Annika Baumann, Weizenbaum Institute for the Networked Society, Germany
  • Christian Meske, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany
  • Constantinos Coursaris, HEC Montreal, Canada
  • Douglas Parry, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
  • Ella Hafermalz, The Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Florian Schwade, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
  • Gohar Khan, The University of Waikato, New Zealand
  • Judith Molka-Danielsen, Molde University College, Norway
  • Liana Razmerita, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Marc-André Kaufhold, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany
  • Mateusz Dolata, University of Zurich, Switzerland
  • Mathias Klier, University of Ulm, Germany
  • Maximilian Förster, University of Ulm, Germany
  • Michael Leyer, University of Rostock, Germany
  • Oliver Posegga, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Reihaneh Bidar, University of Queensland, Australia
  • René Riedl, University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, Austria
  • shahper richter, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
  • Stefan Stieglitz, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Germany
  • Stoney Brooks, Middle Tennessee State University, United States
  • Weifang Wu, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Track N°22: STRAT | Rethinking IS Strategy and Governance in the Digital Age

Track Chairs

Track Description

In the digital age, innovative technologies influence and change established work processes, products, services, and business models by connecting individuals, organizations, machines, and other ‘things’ in new ways, as well as by enabling novel working, collaboration, and automation models (Fitzgerald et al. 2014). To succeed in this highly competitive and dynamic environment, organizations must unfold the potential of advanced digital technologies in their business strategies, transform their work routines, processes and structures, rethink their business models, as well as manage and govern IT infrastructures that are central to their value propositions (Legner et al. 2017). In short, pervasive digitalization has increased the importance of information technology (IT) and transformed the demands placed on organizations in general, and IT functions in particular. Besides ensuring regular IT operations, IT functions are increasingly required to proactively identify technological innovations and to rapidly transfer them into marketable solutions – and with that to directly contribute to their organization’s value proposition (Urbach et al. 2017).

In this context, IS strategizing and governance represent key activities for the effective deployment of IT resources and ultimately for value creation through IT. The emergence of new digital technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence [AI], big-data analytics, blockchain, cloud computing) and infrastructures (e.g., digital platforms and ecosystems), novel value-creation processes and work practices (e.g., IT consumerization, human-robot collaboration, resource sharing) along with the availability of unprecedented data volumes challenge existing conceptualizations and theories related to IS strategy and governance (Markus 2017; Newell & Marabelli 2015). For instance, while cloud services may make the IT artefact seemingly disappear, the challenge of governing the design and use of such services and associated IT resources has become even more acute (Schneider & Sunyaev 2016). Digital business models and gig economy platforms that revolve around resource sharing and/or complex product-service offerings not only challenge organizational boundaries, but also established ideas about ownership of resources, tasks, and outputs (Schor 2014). Similarly, while AI-based algorithms can automate business processes, they also highlight the need for data and process governance (Tarafdar et al. 2017). At the same time, in organizations where more ‘traditional’ technologies and work arrangements are still dominant, IS strategy and governance challenges remain highly complex and important (Wiener et al. 2016).

The objectives of the proposed track are two-fold. First, from a scholarly research perspective, the objective is to foster and promote novel concepts and theories on IS strategy and governance, with a particular focus on the manifold opportunities and challenges associated with the pervasive digitalization of business and society. Second, the track aims at offering insights that enable IS practitioners to leverage emerging digital technologies, to respond to digitalization challenges, and ultimately, to make effective use of available IT resources.

The track is open to all types of contributions—including research in progress—studying IS strategy and governance topics from different stakeholder perspectives, in different contexts and settings (e.g., for-profits and non-profits), at different levels of analysis (e.g., individual, project, program, organizational, network, ecosystem, and societal level), and with different theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches (e.g., conceptual, design-oriented, and empirical studies). We particularly welcome studies that address the conference theme “Human Values Crisis in a Digitizing World” by discussing and expanding our understanding of how digital technologies (e.g., those used for control or governance purposes) and human values influence each other and sometimes conflict, whether at the individual, the organizational and/or the societal level.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital strategizing and strategy implementation (e.g., link to overall business strategy, development of digital capabilities, sustainability of digital strategies, translation of strategic objectives into governance practices and structures)
  • Strategic impact of emerging digital technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence, blockchain, big-data analytics, cloud computing) on business models, governance structures, and processes, etc.
  • Governance of digital transformation and innovation processes (e.g., new governance models for complex organizations, such as companies operating with coexisting ‘brick and mortar’ and digital business models)
  • Changing role of CIO function & New role of CDO function (e.g., ‘digital race’ between CIO and CDO, structure and nature of business-IT relationships)
  • Data-driven leadership and control approaches (e.g., algorithmic management of work processes, technology-mediated control)
  • Governance of digital value-creation processes and networks (e.g., digital platforms and ecosystems, Industry 4.0 and cyber-physical systems, IT consumerization, IT-enabled product-service systems, resource sharing, etc.)
  • Governance of novel work practices (e.g., agile software development, human-robot interaction and collaboration) and sourcing models (e.g., crowdsourcing, multi-sourcing, open-sourcing, and back-sourcing)
  • Information security governance (e.g., cybersecurity frameworks, standards, and policies for critical infrastructures)
  • Dark side of digital strategies/governance, including ethical issues as well as undesired ecological, economic, and socio-emotional side-effects (e.g., technostress)
  • Critical reflections on IS strategy and governance in the digital age (e.g., truly ‘new’ features and challenges of digitalization, links to traditional research streams)
  • Novel theoretical perspectives and research approaches that broaden, or challenge, our understanding of IS strategy and governance in the digital age

REFERENCES
Fitzgerald, M., Kruschwitz, N., Bonnet, D., & Welch, M. (2014) “Embracing Digital Technology: A New Strategic Imperative,” MIT Sloan Management Review, 55(2), 1-12.
Legner, C., Eymann, T., Hess, T., Matt, C., Böhmann, T., Drews, P., Maedche, A., Urbach, N., & Ahlemann F. (2017) “Digitalization: Opportunity and Challenge for the Business and Information Systems Engineering Community,” Business & Information Systems Engineering, 59(4), 301-308.
Markus, M. L. (2017) “Datification, Organizational Strategy, and IS Research: What’s the Score?” Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 26(3), 233-241.
Newell, S., & Marabelli, M. (2015) “Strategic Opportunities (and Challenges) of Algorithmic Decision-Making: A Call for Action on the Long-Term Societal Effects of ‘Datification’,” Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 24(1), 3-14.
Schneider, S., & Sunyaev, A. (2016) “Determinant Factors of Cloud-Sourcing Decisions: Reflecting on the IT Outsourcing Literature in the Era of Cloud Computing,” Journal of Information Technology, 31(1), 1-31.
Schor, J. (2014) “Debating the Sharing Economy,” Journal of Self-Governance and Management Economics, 4(3), 1-13.
Tarafdar, M., Beath, C., & Ross, J. (2017) “Enterprise Cognitive Computing Applications: Opportunities and Challenges,” IT Professional, 19(4), 2-8.
Urbach, N., Drews, P., & Ross, J. (2017) “Digital Business Transformation and the Changing Role of the IT Function,” MIS Quarterly Executive, 16(2), ii-iv.
Wiener, M., Mähring, M., Remus, U., & Saunders, C. (2016) “Control Configuration and Control Enactment in Information Systems Projects: Review and Expanded Theoretical Framework,” MIS Quarterly, 40(3), 741-774.

Associate Editors

  • Andreas Drechsler, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Arne Buchwald, Vlerick Business School, Belgium
  • Bendik Bygstad, University Of Oslo, Norway
  • Christine Legner, HEC Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Daniel Beimborn, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Edward Bernroider, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria
  • Frederik Ahlemann, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
  • Magnus Mähring, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden
  • Paul Drews, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany
  • Robert Keller, University of Applied Sciences Kempten, Germany
  • Ruilin Zhu, Lancaster University, United Kingdom
  • Stefan Henningsson, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Suranjan Chakraborty, Towson University, United States
  • Susanne Strahringer, Technisch Universität Dresden, Germany
  • Thomas Hurni, Institute of Information Systems, University of Bern, Switzerland
  • Till Winkler, University of Hagen, Germany
  • W. Alec Cram, University of Waterloo, Canada
Track N°23: SECURITY | IS Security and privacy in organizations

Track Chairs

Track Description

When organizations implement information security measures, the measures become implicated in organizations’ technological fabric and the ebb and flow of organizational life. While it is plausible to assume that implementing information security has effects on organizing, how information security measures become and what organizational implications they pose seem contingent. When implemented, information security measures may impose control (Cram et al., 2016), constrain the flows of information (Baskerville & Dhillon, 2008), cause stress among employees (D’Arcy et al., 2014), hinder or even prevent performing work practices (Njenga & Brown, 2012; Hannah & Robertson, 2015), effect intrinsic work motivation (Hemin et al., 2020), expose employees’ privacy, and surface ethical concerns like value conflicts (Hedström et al., 2011) and workplace surveillance (Stahl et al., 2012), to name some of the implications. At the same time, practitioners and scholars agree on the enabling role that information security has for contemporary organizing and for digital transformation (Baskerville et al. 2014; Niemimaa & Niemimaa, 2019); information security concerns can hinder or prevent the adoption of digital technologies, and failures can have devastating effects on organizations but also for the societies they serve.
This track invites papers that study broadly the effects of information security on organizing, also including the effects on privacy and ethics. In short, we invite submissions that address the relation between information security, privacy, ethics, and organizing.

The topics include but are not limited to:

  • Information security in digital transformation
  • Impact of information security on work
  • Unintentional or unexpected consequences of information security on organizations.
  • Organizational effects on information security implementation.
  • Applications of organizational theories in IS security.
  • Entanglements of social and material on information security outcomes
  • Process theories on information security transformations.
  • Dialectics of information security organizing.
  • Trade-offs/Balancing between information security and business.
  • Implications of information security to privacy in organizations
  • Ethical conflicts and issues engendered by information security in organizations.

Associate Editors

  • Aggeliki Tsohou, Ionian University, Greece
  • Alain Claude Tambe Ebot, Baruch College, CUNY, United States
  • Ali Padyab, University of Skövde, Sweden
  • Chul Woo Yoo, Florida Atlantic University, United States
  • Devinder Thapa, University of Agder, Norway
  • Gabriela Mallmann, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
  • Hemin Jiang, University of Science and Technology of China, China
  • Joao Baptista, Lancaster University, United Kingdom
  • Jonna Järveläinen, University of Turku, Finland
  • Peter Bednar, University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom
  • Quan Xiao, Jiangxi University of Finance and Economics, China
  • Wael Soliman, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland
  • Xin Luo, University of New Mexico, United States
  • Xiuyan Shao, Southeast University, China
  • Ying Li, Dalian University of Technology, China
Track N°24: SPORT | Digitalization in Sport and Personal Health

Track Chairs

Track Description

The area of sports digitalization is very well fitted for the conference theme, as per the famous words of Nelson Mandela: “Sport has the power to change the world… to unite people in a way that little else does.” During the COVID-19 pandemic that erupted in 2020, the importance and challenges of the continuation of sports around the world became evident. Engaging in sports experiences, sporting activities and physical activities provided diversion, hope, and encouragement. Moreover, the digital transformation of sports performance and consumption has accelerated during the pandemic. As a result, sports have become more accessible, global, inclusive, and digital.

On the professional sport side, though the use of digital tools in sports can be traced back to Michael Lewis’ “Moneyball”, nowadays digitalization in sports settings goes beyond data analytics, and expands to areas such as organizing and managing sports teams and their stakeholders, accessing and interpreting sports information, and engaging with fans. Further, digitalization has also led to the creation of new, born-digital sports (e.g., e-sports), which poses profound implications for the very nature of the sports field.

On the recreational sport side, digitalization has exerted its influence through digital platforms, wearable technologies, and IoT technologies. How individuals and groups engage in, organize, and manage physical activities has changed due to the emergence of new (platform) technologies as well as the availability of data. Moreover, the adoption of wearable technologies spiked during the pandemic, as people increasingly focused on monitoring their health and wellbeing. Finally, this track focuses on the broad phenomenon of digitalization in the context of professional and recreational sport. The goal is two fold: (1) to examine how organizations and individuals have approached digitalization and utilized various digital tools across different sporting areas, as well as how digitalization and/or digital technologies changes the practices and the very organization of sports; (2) to investigate the sports context and how this context can contribute to our understanding of digitalization.

We welcome papers with all methodological approaches and encourage submissions from researchers representing all ontological perspectives. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Digitalization, sports and inclusion
  • Sports analytics, its use and impacts
  • Digitalization of sports related (fan) experiences
  • Digital innovation for sports refereeing or judging
  • Innovative uses of social media for sports fan engagement
  • Technology adoption (e.g., AR or VR) to enhance training methods
  • Digital and data augmentation of physical activities
  • Datafication of recreational sports and wellbeing monitoring
  • Artificial and collaborative intelligence in sports
  • Business models of technology and sports
  • Digital platforms and ecosystems in sports
  • Digital transformation of sports organizations
  • Born-digital sports (e.g., e-sports) and their relationship with traditional sports
  • Digitalization and the changing nature of sports
  • Intertwining of physical and digital components in hybrid sports

Associate Editors

  • Anna Sell, Åbo Akademi University, Finland
  • Arne Gruettner, University of St.Gallen, Switzerland
  • Christopher Califf, Western Washington University, United States
  • Daniel Westmattelmann, University of Muenster, Germany
  • Esko Penttinen, Aalto University, Finland
  • Felix Tan, The University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Jeffrey Treem, The University of Texas at Austin, United States
  • Johanna Pirker, Graz University of Technology, Austria
  • Jonas Landgren, Gothenburg University, Sweden
  • Philippe Baecke, Vlerick Business School, Belgium
  • Raghava Rao Mukkamala, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Tony Ammeter, University of Mississippi, United States
Track N°25: SOURCE | IS Sourcing in the Digital Age

Track Chairs

Track Description

In the digital age, organizations are faced with the challenge of adapting their IS sourcing practices to a number of major changes (Dibbern et al. 2020). First, digital technologies increasingly permeate the processes, products, and services of companies (Venkatraman 2017)—including those IS services and products offered by a vibrant and increasingly complex ecosystem of external service providers that includes consulting companies, standard software providers, specialized development firms, and digital giants. Second, the digital transformation entails a number of concurrent technological shifts such as the rise of AI and new architectural paradigms (e.g., microservices, low-code platforms, and serverless computing) that fundamentally change the nature of the task that is being sourced (Willcocks et al. 2016), reconfigure firm boundaries, and add further complexity to the already confusing number of alternative sourcing arrangements (Lacity et al. 2010; Oshri et al. 2019, Nevo and Kotlarsky, 2020) and governance mechanisms (Benaroch et al. 2016; Gregory et al. 2013; Huber et al. 2013; Kotlarsky et al. 2018; Wiener et al. 2016). Furthermore, with the growing popularity of data-driven business models issues associated with data sourcing are becoming more prevailed (Wiener et al. 2020). To respond to these changes, sourcing professionals will have to adapt their decision and governance practices—offering unique opportunities for researchers to advance understanding of the evolution and socio-technical underpinnings of sourcing practices (Sarker et al. 2019).

This track welcomes papers that improve our understanding of how, why, and under what conditions sourcing can make a positive contribution to the digital transformation of firms. We welcome all types research, including empirical, conceptual, and simulation-based studies that address social, technical, and socio-technical aspects of IS sourcing. We also welcome ‘focus on practice’ submissions. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • In-depth investigations into the complexities and dynamics of sourcing practices
  • Sourcing as driver of digital transformation processes
  • Sourcing of innovative, AI-powered systems, including studies investigating new AI-specific managerial practices such as data governance, management of (algorithmic) learning processes, and the management of autonomous agents (e.g., robots)
  • Technology-driven changes in sourcing practices including studies exploring how increasingly autonomous systems and/or new architectural innovations transform sourcing decision making and sourcing governance
  • Sourcing configurations and sourcing arrangements for the digital age (multi-sourcing, plural sourcing, crowdsourcing, cloudsourcing, etc.)
  • Supplier and client capabilities and competences for the digital age
  • Sourcing governance and in particular studies investigating change processes, holistic configurations of governance mechanisms, and interactions between them
  • Sourcing eco-system
  • Data sourcing
  • Backsourcing/re-shoring decisions driven by the digital transformation and in particular the changing role of IS
  • Sourcing of knowledge-intensive and innovative IS services and products
  • Emerging topics and concepts in sourcing not covered above

Are you interested in additional feedback on your (planned) ECIS submission? Submit an extended abstract to the research forum of the 2021 SIG Sourcing Annual Meeting now! For more information, please visit the following website: https://communities.aisnet.org/sigsourcing/conferences/sigam#SIGAM2021

Associate Editors

  • Angelika Zimmermann, Loughborough University, United Kingdom
  • Cancan Wang, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Daniel Peter Gozman, The University of Sydney Business School, Australia
  • Eleni Lioliou, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom
  • Esko Penttinen, Aalto University, Finland
  • Giovanni Vaia, Ca’Foscari University, Italy
  • Jos van Hillegersberg, University of Twente, Netherlands

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The 30th European Conference on Information Systems

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